Continental Grand Prix 5000 Endurance Test

Published: 2019-07-12 | Jarno Bierman

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Closeup of Continental Grand Prix 5000

Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. First update at 620 miles / 1000 km
  3. Comments

This is an endurance road test of a pair of Continental Grand Prix 5000 that will be tested on our rolling resistance test machine every 620 miles / 1000 km. This test will take a while to complete as we expect to cycle about 62 miles / 100 km per week with an update to this article every 2-3 months.


Buy Continental Grand Prix 5000 at Amazon.com


We've already done a test with a pair of worn Grand Prix 4000S II that was sent in by a reader who used them for 5000 miles / 8000 km. Because we received a lot of comments about the cracked rubber of that pair of Grand Prix 4000S II, we've decided to do an even better test with measurements every 620 miles / 1000 km. These measurements will give us valuable information about how the tires behave over their entire life cycle.


The bike (and tires) used for this test is stored in an underground basement where the ambient temperature is between 10 - 15 C year-round. There will be zero exposure to sunlight when the bike is in storage. We think these conditions are the best possible conditions to store tires so this take this into account when reading the results.


Both the front 28-622 and rear 32-622 are inflated to an air pressure of 65 psi / 4.5 bars (checked every ride) that provides a relatively comfortable ride. Rider weight with gear is close to 75 kg and bike weight is 10kg.


First update at 620 miles / 1000 km


Ride statistics and visual inspection


Ride statistics
Total distance 620 miles / 1000 km
Wet roads 101 miles / 162 km
Dry roads 519 miles / 838 km
Average temperature 12.5 C
Average speed 17.6 mph / 28.2 km/h
Inflation pressure 65 psi / 4.5 bars
Flat tires 0

After the first 620 miles / 1000 km, both the front 28-622 and rear 32-622 still look brand new. The mold line that runs through the middle of the tire is still easily visible on the front tire and can still be seen on the rear tire when you really look for it. The casings of both tires also still look like brand new.


We've had zero flat tires during the first 620 miles / 1000 km. After inspecting both tires, we did remove 2 small pieces of glass that were stuck in the tread but did not penetrate the tire.


GP 5000 28-622 (front) condition after 620 miles / 1000 km:

Continental Grand Prix 5000 28-622 after 620 miles / 1000 km

GP 5000 32-622 (rear) condition after 620 miles / 1000 km:

Continental Grand Prix 5000 32-622 after 620 miles / 1000 km

Front 28-622 measurements after 620 miles / 1000 km


Measurements GP 5000 28-622 (front)
New 0 miles / 0 km 620 miles / 1000 km
Weight 235 grams 233 grams
Wear marker 0.70 mm 0.65 mm
Tread Thickness 2.6 mm 2.6 mm
Width 28.5 mm 29.0 mm
Rolling Resistance 100 psi / 6.9 bars 10.3 Watts 11.2 Watts
Rolling Resistance 80 psi / 5.5 bars 11.5 Watts 12.2 Watts
Rolling Resistance 60 psi / 4.1 bars 14.1 Watts 14.6 Watts
Loading Chart...

Wear of the front 28-622 is very low. Weight has gone down by 2 grams and it looks like the tread is going to last a long, long time.


Something that surprised us was the width of the tire has increased from 28.5 mm to 29.0 mm which shows that the tire will stretch slightly in the first 620 miles / 1000 km even at our relatively low air pressure of 65 psi / 4.1 bars.


To make things clearer about the width measurements: the "new" width measurements were taken after the original rolling resistance tests. This means the tires have already run 60 to 90 minutes on the machine at pressures between 60 - 120 psi. In other words, some initial stretch is already included in the "new" measurements.


The rolling resistance tests tell us that rolling resistance has gone up by 4 - 9 % depending on air pressure which is something you might not expect from well run in tires. We have to wait for more measurements to see if rolling resistance stabilizes at this level, goes down, or goes up further.


Measurements GP 5000 32-622 (rear)
New 0 miles / 0 km 620 miles / 1000 km
Weight 278 grams 274 grams
Wear marker 0.90 mm 0.80 mm
Tread Thickness 2.7 mm 2.5 mm
Width 31.8 mm 32.4 mm
Rolling Resistance 100 psi / 6.9 bars 9.7 Watts 10.5 Watts
Rolling Resistance 80 psi / 5.5 bars 11.0 Watts 11.7 Watts
Rolling Resistance 60 psi / 4.1 bars 12.9 Watts 13.6 Watts
Loading Chart...

As expected, the rear 32-622 GP 5000 shows more wear than the front 28-622 GP 5000. Our measurements come in somewhere between 0.10 - 0.20 mm of wear in the first 620 miles / 1000 km.


Just like the 28-622 front, the rear 32-622 has stretched and its width has increased from 31.8 mm to 32.4 mm.


Even though the rear GP 5000 has slightly more wear, rolling resistance of the rear 32-622 GP 5000 has also gone up by 5 - 9 %. It looks like the rubber compound has already lost some of its ultra-fast rolling properties after the first 620 miles / 1000 km even when it's stored under optimal conditions.


Conclusion after the first 620 miles / 1000 km.


Wear rate of the GP 5000 looks to be very low and puncture resistance also looks to be good as we had 0 flats in the first 620 miles / 1000 km.


Rolling resistance of both the 28-622 and 32-622 has increased by 4 - 9 % depending on air pressure which is something that actually surprised us. We think most people expect tires to become faster rolling when the tread wears down as there will be less material to deform.


Most tires that roll really fast have a lot of rebound in the casing/tread when you take them out of the packaging and deform the tire with your hands. After testing a lot of tires, we generally already know if a tire is fast or slow rolling simply based on how easily the tire rebounds when it's deformed. It looks like the GP 5000 loses some of these properties in at least the first 620 miles / 1000 km.


We'll have to wait for the next measurements to see if rolling resistance stabilizes at this level or the trend continues or reverses.


Buy Continental Grand Prix 5000 at Amazon.com


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